Student Loans Likely Funded Manchester Suicide Bomber

27 May 2017

2017/05/27 – Manchester suicide bomber used student loan and benefits to fund terror plot – The Telegraph

The Manchester suicide bomber used taxpayer-funded student loans and benefits to bankroll the terror plot, police believe.


Abedi’s finances are a major ‘theme’ of the police inquiry amid growing alarm over the ease with which jihadists are able to manipulate Britain’s welfare and student loans system to secure financing.

One former detective said jihadists were enrolling on university courses to collect the student loans “often with no intention of turning up”.

Abedi was given at least £7,000 from the taxpayer-funded Student Loans Company after beginning a business administration degree at Salford University in October 2015.

It is thought he received a further £7,000 in the 2016 academic year even though by then he had already dropped out of the course.


Abedi, 22, never held down a job, according to neighbours and friends, but was able to travel regularly between the UK and Libya.

This will be included in the running Manchester thread.

Great moments in entitlement history… gotta love it…sigh… but this is part of the reason for this website – to keep track of these things as it fades off of the main news highlights. We have to put these things together if we are going to govern ourselves effectively.

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Obama Pressure Republicans to Increase Unemployment Benefiits

7 Jan 2014

Obama pressures Republicans to extend unemployment benefits – Washington Examiner

President Obama on Tuesday called on Republicans to extend unemployment benefits to 1.3 million Americans for three months, looking to build momentum for the federal aid after the measure cleared a major hurdle in the Senate.

“We’ve got to get this across the finish line without obstruction or delay, and we need the House of Representatives to be able to vote for this as well,” Obama said from the East Room of the White House, surrounded by Americans who lost unemployment benefits in late December.


The Obama administration estimates that failing to extend unemployment beyond 26 weeks would cost the economy roughly 240,000 jobs. But some Republicans counter that extending such benefits would keep Americans perpetually unemployed and limit their motivation to return to the workforce.

So here we are again with another government finance crisis. To have crisis after crisis that are only solved with temporary “fixes” is insanity from a problem solving perspective. From a political perspective, it does give the President and Democrats more opportunities to make Republicans look heartless. The latter is obviously the goal here.

There is a problem with the last paragraph quoted above – it’s not true. The logic behind that statement implies that if we put money in the hands of the unemployed, they will spend it and therefore businesses will have income to keep jobs. Here’s the problem. The money that the unemployed receive is recycled money – it comes from taxes paid from people who are working. In other words, we are simply shifting around money at this point from those who are working to those who are not working. So yes, unemployed people can buy more, but people who are employed and pay taxes will buy less. There is no net benefit.

At some point, we need to add in the ability to produce more money – but right now, there are numerous regulations that hinder manufacturing and production. But if we want to shift money around, I suggest shifting money away from the federal government towards the private sector. We are much better at using money than the federal government.


Social Security Administration – COLA for Next Year Lowest in Years

30 Oct 2013

Social Security set to announce annual COLA; benefit increase to be among lowest in years – Washington Post

The cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, is based on a government measure of inflation that is being released Wednesday.

Preliminary figures suggest a raise of roughly 1.5 percent, which would make it among the smallest since automatic adjustments were adopted in 1975. The increase will be small because consumer prices, as measured by the government, haven’t gone up much in the past year.


Since 1975, annual Social Security raises have averaged 4.1 percent. Only six times have they been less than 2 percent, including three of the past five years. This year’s increase was 1.7 percent. There was no COLA in 2010 or 2011 because inflation was too low.

By law, the cost-of-living adjustment is based on the consumer price index for urban wage earners and clerical workers, a broad measure of consumer prices generated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It measures price changes for food, housing, clothing, transportation, energy, medical care, recreation and education.

The COLA is calculated by comparing consumer prices in July, August and September each year to prices in the same three months from the previous year. If prices go up over the course of the year, benefits go up, starting with payments delivered in January.